Trips › Border region

trip
Trip to the border region
22 November 2021
EHTW; Twente EDWN; Nordhorn EDLS; Stadtlohn EHTE; Teuge EHHV; Hilversum

From Hilversum to Twente

Even before the weekend, the weather forecast for Monday was such that it would be a shame not to take advantage of it to do some flying. We booked the Cessna in advance so we could make sure it would be available. Monday, of course, was a weekday, and there were no others to fly with. But that didn't spoil the fun.

In the morning we first had work appointments and some things to take care of, but then the room was clear to go to the airfield. From the airfield, the two cross-border mandatory flight plans were submitted by phone. The first flight from Twente to Nordhorn, and the second from Stadtlohn to Teuge. No flight plans were required for the other three flights.

After take-off and leaving the traffic pattern, I flew to the north-west, passing Baarn soon thereafter. At Baarn is the Groeneveld Castle with a garden park. We frequently visit the garden park and the castle.

West of Nijkerk is the Arkemheense polder, one of the oldest polders in the Netherlands. The Hertog Reijnout Steam Pumping Station, or Steam Pumping Station Arkemheen, was built in the 1880s to replace a windmill that was used to drain the polder (more about the history of the pumping station in this trip report).

Castle Groeneveld, Baarn
Castle Groeneveld, Baarn
Steam Pumping Station Arkemheen
Steam Pumping Station Arkemheen
Groeneveld Castle

Groeneveld Castle was built around 1710 and is considered a beautiful example of a country house from the Rococo period. The wings were added around 1760. Groeneveld Castle is managed by Staatsbosbeheer, with nature and landscape as the leading themes. Staatsbosbeheer also manages the Groeneveld estate, which covers some 321 acres, with a garden park. There is a Grand Café with terrace in the coach house at Groeneveld Castle.

North of Nijkerk is a country house, the Salentein Estate. Salentein has been owned by the Pon family since 1980. A restaurant has been established in the coach house. The main building is in use as a venue for meetings and events, including weddings and funerals according to their website.

Further down the route, between the river Gelderse IJssel and Twente, lies the Sallandse Heuvelrug National Park. Located on the Holterberg is the Holten Canadian War Cemetery, one of the largest military cemeteries in the Netherlands.

The hills of the Sallandse Heuvelrug were formed during the ice age. Continental ice pushed the land upwards and this was covered by a layer of wind-blown sand. In many places this poor soil still forms the basis for existing vegetation. After the ice ages woodland developed on the hills. In the stone age hunters and farmers settled on the higher land where it was drier. Their burial mounds can still be found there. Later settlers cleared the woodland for farming and the result is a mainly heathland landscape. Sheep grazing kept the heathland open. Most of the present woodland was planted in the last century for timber.

Parked near the beginning of runway 05 at Twente Airport were five Embraer E175 regional transport aircraft belonging to the Danish leasing company Nordic Aviation Captial. The aircraft previously flew with Alitalia Cityliner. Alitalia CityLiner ceased operations at the same time as its parent company, Alitalia, on 15 October 2021.

With some headwind en route, the PH-GYS landed after a 45-minute flight time. The last time we flew to Twente was over three years ago. In the trip report of that time is also information about the history of the airport.

Salentein manor house
Salentein manor house
Alitalia aircraft parked at Twente
Alitalia aircraft parked at Twente
Volkswagen Bus and Pon

When the Dutch brothers Ben and Wijn Pon from Amersfoort learned about the proposed Volkswagen around 1937, they saw this as an unique opportunity and immediately began campaigning to become the first agency selling the vehicle outside Germany. At the onset of hostilities the Wolfsburg Volkswagen factory was enlisted as part of Germany's war effor, producing armaments in addition to components for the nation's aircraft industry.

When Ben Pon returned to Wolfsburg following Germany's surrender, he saw a factory that had been saved from destruction. Ben Pon was keen to re-establish the rights bestowed to him to trade the Volkswagen in Holland and elsewhere. Pon imported a batch of ten Beetles to Holland in the first half of 1947, and his company became agent general for Holland.

Pon showed intense interest in Wolfsburg and was keen to see the results of ongoing developments concerning the Beetle. In the factory motorised flatbed trolley's were used for transportation. Seeing these flatbed trolleys in use gave Pon the idea of devising a commercial derivative based on the Beetle chassis and running gear. Taking his notebook from his pocket Pon roughly sketched his ideas for a 750kg enclosed vehicle with forward control. The new chief designer's first assignment at Wolfsburg in the autumn of 1948 was to develop Ben Pon's idea. The first prototype Transporter was made ready for testing in March 1949.

Pon's sketch
Pon's sketch
Volkswagen T1 prototype
Volkswagen T1 prototype

Source: The Volkswagen Bus Book

From Twente to Nordhorn

After a short stop with coffee and after paying the landing fee, I continued on to Nordhorn. It was a flight of a few minutes, but because it crosses the border with Germany, the Netherlands wants a flight plan to be submitted for it. The flightplan had already been filed before departure from Hilversum, so it only had to be activated by Twente Radio.

After passing the towns Oldezaal and Nordhorn, the landing could already be started. In the distance, the cooling towers with clouds of steam were visible from the gas power plant and nuclear power plant near Lingen. After landing, the flugleiter closed the flightplan.

Rene at Twente airport
René at Twente airport
Rear window view after take-off runway 05
Rear window view after take-off runway 05
Oldenzaal
Oldenzaal
Final runway 05 Nordhorn aerodrome
Final runway 05 Nordhorn aerodrome

From Nordhorn to Stadtlohn

At the airport, I spoke with two brothers who were at the airport waiting for a potential buyer of their homebuilt ultralight aircraft, in which they themselves could no longer fly due to losing their medicals. It must have been quite a step to say goodbye to it.

After some time, it was time to move on again. There was a flight plan ready from Stadtlohn to Teuge, and in principle the flight plan is still valid for half an hour after estimated time of departure. South of the aerodrome is the Nordhorn air/ground shooting range. The area would become active from 2pm, so it was good to leave before then to get some photos of it.

Rene at Nordhorn aerodrome
René at Nordhorn aerodrome
Nordhorn air/ground shooting range
Nordhorn air/ground shooting range
Nordhorn air/ground shooting range

The Nordhorn air/ground shooting range is the largest training area used by the Air Force in Germany. The actual training room for the pilots is much larger than the Nordhorn Range. It is a special restricted flight area, marked on the flight maps as ED-R37 Alpha and Bravo. The Nordhorn Range itself represents the target area for dropping the exercise bombs and for the use of the on-board cannon.

A-10 Thunderbolt practicing at Nordhorn
A-10 Thunderbolt practicing at Nordhorn
Luftwaffe Panavia Tornado
Luftwaffe Panavia Tornado

Runway 11 was in use at the Stadtlohn airport. After landing, I had a chat with an instructor and his student Ralph, who turned out to be a professional classical pianist. The instructor had comments about flight training in Portugal. He also mentioned that when approaching reporting point Sierra south of Teuge Airport, he made a looping with a Fuji FA-200 instead of doing a 360 when once there was another aircraft approaching as well.

Left downwind runway 11 Stadtlohn
Left downwind runway 11 Stadtlohn
View to the east from the tower
View to the east from the tower

From Stadtlohn to Teuge

When we finished the coffee it was time to move on again. There were no noteworthy events for the flight to Teuge. At Teuge I stopped by to have a coffee with Goof. Then I continued my way back to Hilversum to be back in time for sunset.

Departure from Stadtlohn
Departure from Stadtlohn
Borculo
Borculo
Stoeterij Beltmanshoeve between Sierra and Teuge
Stoeterij Beltmanshoeve near Teuge
Right base runway 08 Teuge aerodrome
Right base runway 08 Teuge aerodrome

From Teuge to Hilversum

During lining up for departure from runway 08, Teuge Radio reminded me to make a left turn after take-off. There seems to be a fair amount of complaining, but as is usually the case with small airfields, the lion's share of the complaints are only from one or two people. The forest of the Veluwe looked beautiful in the autumn colors. During the last part of the flight the visibility was somewhat limited due to the low sun. After landing on runway 07 and parking, all that was left was to fill out the paperwork, and then head home.

Over the Veluwe
Over the Veluwe
Amersfoort, Nieuwland district
Amersfoort, Nieuwland district

The Veluwe is a forest-rich ridge of hills that was formed by the Saalian glacial some 200,000 years ago. Glaciers some 200 metres thick pushed the sand deposits in the Rhine and Maas Delta sideways, creating the hills which now form most of the Veluwe. See this trip report from 2020 of a flight around The Veluwe.

Final runway 07 Hilversum airfield
Final runway 07 Hilversum airfield
The Cessna at sundown
The Cessna at sundown

Other Trips | Top