Trips / Mensanello

trip
Weekend trip to Mensanello
7-11 August 2020
EDLP; Paderborn-Lippstadt EDMK; Kempten LISO; Mensanello LIKO; Ozzano EDMA; Augsburg EDFR; Rothenburg o.d.T.

From Paderborn-Lippstadt to Kempten-Durach

From Friday August 7 2020 until Tuesday August 11 we made a little trip to and from Mensanello, near Siena in Tuscany, Italy. We had booked the C182 with registration D-ELXC, a 1980 turbo charged Cessna 182 with retractable gear. On Thursday we first drove to Steinhausen, where we already had booked a room in the hotel that we had discovered in 2018.

The plan was to fly first to Kempten in the south of Germany and to top the tanks there again before moving on to Italy. Fuel prices in Italy were about €10.22 per US gallon for AVGAS, while in Kempten the price was €6.77 per gallon. The club reimburses €4.73 per gallon for fuel (all August 2020 prices).

We already had filed the flightplans to Kempten and then to Mensanello at home through the internet via the website of the Deutsche Flugsicherung. Also we used that website to check the NOTAMs. So on Friday morning we only had to check the weather and possible new NOTAMs. After breakfast we went to the airport, fueled the plane, and we went on our way to Italy.

Rene fueling before departure
René fueling before departure
Take-off runway 24 Paderborn-Lippstadt
Take-off runway 24 Paderborn-Lippstadt

Near Boxberg we passed the Boxberg proving ground, a handling course of vehicle industry proving grounds which provides the possibility to examine vehicle behaviour, vehicle manoeuvrability, and technical settings under controlled no-traffic circumstances.

Bosch test center at Boxberg

An important component of the development process for vehicle systems are the practical trials performed by the system supplier. Not all tests can be carried out on public roads. Since 1998 Bosch has performed this part of the development process at its test center near Boxberg between Heilbronn and Würzburg (south Germany). The 92-hectare site provides facilities for testing all conceivable handling, safety and convenience systems and components to the limit. Seven different sections of test track allow systems to be tested to their physical limits under all types of road conditions and driving situations – and under the safest possible conditions for the test dirvers and vehicles.

The rough-surface (1) are designed for speeds up to 50 km/h and 100 km/h respectively. The following types of surfaces are provided: pot holes; undulations; high-vibration surface; cobblestones, and variable-surface sections.

The asphalted gradient sections (2) for hill-start and uphill acceleration testing with gradients of 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% include sprayable, paved sections of various widths.

There are two ford sections (3) with lengths of 100 meters and 30 meters respectively and depthis of 0.3 and 1 meter.
There are special sprayed sections (4) with the following surfaces: chessboard (asphalt and paving slabs); asphalt; paving slabs; blue basalt; concrete; an aquaplaning sections and a trapezium-shaped blue-basalt section.

The skid pan (5) for testing cornering characteristics has an asphalt surface 300 meters in diameter. Parts of it can be watered to simulate ice and wet roads. It is surrounded by a safety barrier made of tires in order to protect drivers and vehicles.
The high-speed (6) has three tracks and can be used by commercial vehicles as well as cars. This section is designed to allow speeds of up to 200 km/h.
The handling track (9) incorporates two sections – one for speeds of up to 50 km/h, and one for speeds up to 80 km/h. Both sections have corners of varying severity and degrees of camber. The handling track is mainly used for testing handling-stability control systems.

View of the test-track section modules
View of the test-track modules

1. Rough-surface sections; 2. Gradient sections; 3. Ford sections; 4. Special watered sections; 5. Skid pan; 6. High-speed circuit; 7. Building (Workshops, Offices, Test benches, Laboratories, Filling stations and Staff common rooms); 8. Access road; 9. Handling track

Over Ulm we saw the historic Ulm Minster church, which suffered only minor damage when the Britisch RAF bombed the city centre of Ulm in the closing months of World War II, leaving over 80% of the medieval city centre in ruins. Until the eventual completion of Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, it will remain the tallest church in the world with a steeple of 161 metres.

Veleda and Rene
Veleda and René
Ulmer Munster
Ulmer Münster in Ulm

After two hours we landed on Runway 17 of Kempten-Durach airfield in the south of Germany. We topped the tanks, adding 29 US gallons. After a drink at the airfield restaurant we went back to the airplane for the next leg to Mensanello.

Left base runway 17 Kempten airfield
Left base runway 17 Kempten airfield
Fueling at Kempten
Fueling at Kempten

From Kempten-Durach to Mensanello

Some airplanes had been taking-off from runway 25, but we were directed to runway 35. Because of the heat and the altitude of the airfield the density altitude was 5,000 ft, but that was no problem for the 182. After take-off and leaving the traffic circuit we started our climb to 9,500 ft to the south-east, to roughly the point where the Autobahn 7 crosses the border with Austria near Füssen.

Autobahn 7 is the longest German Autobahn and the longest national motorway in Europe at 963 km. In the north, it starts at the border with Denmark. In the south, the autobahn 7 ends at the Austrian border.

Füssen was settled in Roman times, on the Via Claudia Augusta, an ancient Roman road that linked the valley of the Po River with Augusta Vindelicum (today's Augsburg) across the Alps.

South of Füssen we entered the Alps. We past Reutte aerodrome along the River Lech in Austria, where we had been during our flying summer holiday in 2013. We flew south-west of the Zugspitze (9,718 ft) – the highest mountain in Germany. The Austria-Germany border runs over its western summit.

Innsbruck Radar cleared us to cross the Innsbruck airspace to the Brenner on the border between Austria and Italy. There we switched to Padova Information, but we were not yet able to contact them between the mountains until we reached the Bolzano area.

Rottachsee
Rottachsee
Innsbruck
Innsbruck

North of Verona, more or less abeam Riva del Garda, we contacted Verona approach to request to cross its airspace to the south at 7,500 ft, which was approved. We left the mountainous terrain of the Alps behind us, and crossed the River Po plain in the direction of Bologna. In the south of the Verona airspace we were handed over to Bologna Approach, and we received clearance to cross the Bologna airspace.

Riva del Garda
Riva del Garda
River Po
River Po

We passed the city of Modena – famous for its sports car makers Ferrari, Lamborghini and Maserati. Tenor Luciano Pavarotti was born in 1935 on the outskirts of Modena.

South of Modena we headed to the south-east to pick-up the Autostrada A1 accross the Apennines mountain range between Bologna to Firenze.

The Autostrada A1 is the oldest European Highway and the most important in Italy. The highway links the largest cities on the Tyrrhenian side of Italy: Milan, Bologna, Florence, Rome and Naples. At 754 km, it is the longest Italian autostrada. The A1 reduced travel time between Milan and Naples from two days to just seven to eight hours. The mountain crossing from Bologna to Florence is known as Variante di Valico.

We were handed over to Firenze Approach, and we could continue at 7,500 ft within Firenze airspace to the south. South in the Firenze airpace, during our descend to Mensanello, we were handed over to Grosseto Approach. When passing 3,000 ft near Mensanello we requested to leave the frequency, but we could not hear Grosseto Approach anymore.

After landing on runway 07 of Mensanello airfield, we met with Marcello. In the meantime Grosseto had called the operator of the airfield to ask if we had landed. Upon confirmation Grosseto had already closed our flightplan. We had arranged a place in one of the hangars, and Marcello had come to the airfield to let us in the hangar with our parking place. Afterwards he took us with our luggage in his car to the nearby hotel uphill in Mensanello.

At the hotel we also had contact with Malcolm via the telephone. Marcello and Malcolm had been very helpful. Thank you!

Modena
Modena
Marcello welcoming us at Mensanello
Marcello welcoming us at Mensanello

In Mensanello

Friday evening we had an excellent diner at the restaurant of Tenuta di Mensanello. When we booked the hotel earlier that week, we first checked for Tenuta di Mensanello, but they were already fully booked. On Saturday morning we walked to the airfield where we had coffee with Marcello and two other persons who were there. We then walked back to the hotel to further relax, and to decide where to fly to the next day.

We had not been in Augsburg before, and we decided to give it a try. We decided to make a fuel stop at Kempten, as the fuel price there was more favourable than in Augsburg (€6.77 vs €8.71 per US gallon). As we had used 32 gallons from Kempten to Mensanello and we had about 56 gallons left, we should be able to easily reach Kempten with ample reserve. There was almost no wind. If we were going to burn 36 gallons we would still have about 20 gallons left in the tanks.

Nevertheless we decided to fuel 12 gallons more at Ozzano, giving us effectively about half an hour extra reserve, taking into account the additional start-up and climb from Ozzano. We filed the flight plans to Ozzano and Kempten at Schiphol FIO by telephone. In the evening we had an excellent diner again at Tenuta di Mensanello.

Rene with the C182 in the east hangar
René with the C182 in the east hangar
Veleda reading a book
Veleda reading a book
View to the south from Mensanello
View to the south from Mensanello
Diner with a nice Chianti, of course
Diner with a nice Chianti, of course

From Mensanello to Ozzano

The next morning before breakfast we checked the weather and the NOTAMs. The gafor showed open VFR conditions along the route through the Alps. After breakfast we checked out, and one of the hotel staff drove us to the nearby airfield with our luggage. We checked the plane, and then we took-off from runway 25 to Ozzano. Malcolm was waving at us when we past the hangar on the west side of the airfield, but we only noticed that in the picture when we were already back home.

We contacted Firenze approach for crossing, which was approved. We passed the medieval hill town of San Gimignano with its tower houses.

Veleda and Rene at Mensanello airfield
Veleda and René at Mensanello airfield
San Gimignano
San Gimignano

Florence (Firenze) was unusually quiet due to the Covid-19 outbreak. Normally the center of the town is packed with tourists during the summer, with long queues for the Galleria Degli Uffizi, the Duomo and the Museo di San Marco.

North of Florence we crossed the Apennines mountains. After we were handed-over to Bologna Approach they informed us that a direct heading to Ozzano would be approved, which we accepted.

Florence Cathedral
Florence Cathedral
Apennines mountains north of Florence
Apennines mountains north of Florence

Upon landing at Ozzano runway 03 we taxied to the fuel station. We struggled somewhat with the payment terminal. It did not recognize our credit card, but the terminal also accepted bank notes. We insterted €110. The pump at first did not start, but with the assistance of someone from the aerodrome we finally got the pump working.

Ozzano Emilia aerodrome
Ozzano Emilia aerodrome
Veleda at Ozzano aerodrome
Veleda at Ozzano aerodrome

From Ozzano to Kempten

After fueling we had time to have something to drink before our next scheduled time of departure in the flight plan that we had filed the day before. Veleda had a Cappuccino, and René had asked for a large American coffee with milk. The Cappuccino came as expected, but the large American coffee with milk came as the strong Italian coffee in a dollhouse cup with a small milk jug – a mistake that we had not made for the first time.

After our drinks it was time for our scheduled departure, and we walked back to the airplane. After departure we contacted Padova Information to activate the flight plan, and switched to Bologna Approach to climb. At first we were approved to climb to 8,500 ft, but that was then withdrawn and replaced to climb to 4,500 ft for the first part to Verona.

Having a coffee before departure
Having a coffee before departure
Over the Po Valley
Over the Po Valley

East if Verona and outside the Verona airspace at the foot of the Alps we climbed to 8,500 ft. There were less clouds than on the way up. Padova Information instructed us to contact Innsbruck Radar at the Brenner.

Foot of the Alps east of Lago di Garda
Foot of the Alps east of Lago di Garda
Crossing the Alps
Crossing the Alps

After Innsbruck west of the Zugspitze we descended to see Füssen and the famous Castle Neuschwanstein (history) that we visited in 2013. From there we flew to Kempten-Durach airfield where we landed on runway 35, and then taxied to the fuel station. We topped the tanks, adding almost 61 gallons, indicating that we had 27 gallons left. Without the fuel stop in Ozzano we would have been left with approximately 21 gallons.

Neuschwanstein Castle
Neuschwanstein Castle
Final runway 35 Kempten airfield
Final runway 35 Kempten airfield

From Kempten to Augsburg

We had a lunch at the airfield restaurant at Kempten, and then we moved on to Augsburg. We did not file a flight plan for the short flight to Augsburg. After take-off we noticed that the attitude indicator was not working, and there was a sound of hissing air. As the suction was working, it appeared that there was either a leakage or a loose connection between the vacuum pump and the attitude indicator. We did not further bother as the weather was going to stay perfect.

On the way we noticed the Skyline amusement park north of Bad Wörishofen that René recognized from an earlier trip to the airfield of Bad Wörishofen.

Around Durach after take-off runway 35
Around Durach after take-off runway 35
Augsburg
Augsburg

Upon approached Augsburg, we asked for a straight-in approach to runway 07, but our request was denied. We had to proceed to the south-east of the CTR, and from there to the north-west to the airport. Augsburg Tower cleared us to land on runway 07, and to park the plane next to a TB-20 on Apron 2. From the airport we took a taxi to the hotel in the city that we had booked in the airport terminal after we arrived.

To runway 07 Augsburg airport
To runway 07 Augsburg airport
Rene at Augsburg airport
René at Augsburg airport

In Augsburg

Augsburg is after Munich and Nuremberg the third-largest city in Bavaria. It was founded in 15 BC by the Romans as Augusta Vindelicorum, named after the Roman emperor Augustus. As an independent city state from the 13th century, it was also one of its wealthiest, free to raise its own taxes, with public coffers bulging on the proceeds of the textile trade. However, from the 16th century, religious strife and economic decline plagued the city. Augsburg finally joined the Kingdom of Bavaria in 1806.

Augsburg

City Hall
City Hall

The city hall is one of the major attractions in Augsburg. The city architect, Elias Holl, built the most significant secular structure of the German Renaissance between 1615 and 1620. The Golden Hall, named after its golden guilded wooden ceiling, was finished in 1624. It is one of the most imposing archetypical Wrooms in Germany and demonstrates the grandeur of the Imperial City.

Perlach Tower
Perlach Tower

The Perlach Tower is the bell tower in the core of the romanesque St. Peter's church. The Perlach Tower was heightened between 1614 and 1616 by Elias Holl in Renaissance style. Inside the church there is the romanesque Christ the Saviour, the Fugger cross, and the painting of Mary Untier of Knots.

Cathedral of St.Mary
Cathedral of St.Mary

The Ottonic Cathedral of St.Mary was built around 1000 CE on top of a Carolingian structure from which the crypt is preserved. Five Romanesque stained glass prophets windows from 1065 are the oldest figurative stained glass cycle in the world. In the 14th and 15th centuries a Gothic chancel and two important figural portals were added to the church. The cathedral contains hundreds of artisically crafted tombstones from 1285.

Waterworks at the Red Gate
Waterworks at the Red Gate

The waterworks at the Red Gate is an ensemble of three water towers, two fountain master houses and an aqueduct which had its beginnings in 1416. The waterworks were in operation until 1879. The exhibition in the small and large water towers and in the fountain master's house describes the system of water wheel powered piston pumps which were used. The Swabian Craftsmen Museum is in the lower fountain master's house.

Augustus fountain
Augustus fountain

The Augustus fountain is a work by Hubert Gerhard. The bronze sculpture of the Augsburg's founder has been standing on the city hall square since 1594. The figures of the rivers Lech, Wertach, SIngold and Brunnenbach are sitting at the edge of the pool. Adriaen de Vries was the sculptor commissioned to create the bronze figures for the Mercury fountain on Moritzplatz (since 1599) and on Hercules fountain 1600.

In Augsburg In Augsburg
Sights of Augsburg

From Augsburg to Rothenburg ob der Tauber

The next morning after breakfast we took a taxi back to the airport. After paying the landing and parking fee, we departed from runway 07 to the exit point in the north-east of the CTR. Then we set course to the north-north-west, in the direction of Rothenburg ob der Tauber, and we passed the River Lech for the last time on this trip.

Departure from Augsburg airport
Departure from Augsburg airport
Run-of-river power plant Ellgau in the river Lech
Run-of-river power plant Ellgau, River Lech

We past Donauwörth along the River Danube with the Airbus Helicopters plant. Further down the route we passed the town of Feuchtwangen. Its origins can be traced back to a Benedictine monastery first mentioned in a document in 818 or 819.

River Danube, Donauworth, Airbus Helicopters Deutschland
River Danube, Donauwörth
Feuchtwangen
Feuchtwangen
Donauwörth is Airbus Helicopters' main site in Germany and its second-largest worldwide. The H135 and the H145 are designed, manufactured and sold here – as well as the support helicopter Tiger and the transport and naval helicopter, NH90, for the German Armed Forces and other customers. The site is also home to the military support centre, where Bundeswehr helicopters such as CH-53, Sea Lynx and Sea King are serviced and equipped with the latest technology. Besides helicopters also about 80% of all Airbus aircraft doors are are manufactured in Donauwörth.

When we approached Rothenburg ob der Tauber we first made an orbit around the town (without overflying it) before we landed on runway 03. Someone who just came to the airfield offered to take us to the town, which we gladly accepted. In the meantime we had booked a hotel.

Rothenburg o.d.T.
Rothenburg o.d.T.
Veleda at Rothenburg o.d.T. aerodrome
Veleda at Rothenburg o.d.T. aerodrome

In Rothenburg ob der Tauber

Rothenburg ob der Tauber is well known for its well-preserved medieval old town, a destination for tourists from around the world. With its web of cobbled lanes, higgledy-piggledy houses and towered walls, the town is the archetypal fairy-tale Germany.

Around 40% of Rothenburg ob der Tauber, mainly in the eastern half of the town, had to be repaired or rebuilt after being bombed in World War II. Many of the rebuilt facades can now be distinguished from the surviving medieval structures as being more plain, since the reconstruction aimed not to replicate exactly what stood before, but only to rebuild in the same style as the surviving buildings, so that the new buildings would still fit into the overall aesthetic of the town. Any surviving walls of bombed-out buildings were kept in their reconstructed facades as much as possible.

In the case of more significant or iconic structures, such as the town hall (whose roof was destroyed) and parts of the town wall, restoration to their original state was done as accurately as possible, and these now appear exactly as they had before the war. Donations for the rebuilding works in Rothenburg were received from all over the world, and rebuilt parts of the walls feature commemorative bricks with donor names. While much of the eastern portion of Rothenburg was destroyed or damaged in World War II and has been subsequently restored, the older western section from which the medieval town originated (and which contains most of the town's historic monuments) did not suffer from the bombing. Thus, most of the buildings in the west and south of Rothenburg still exist today in their original medieval or pre-war state.

It is also noteworthy that while the eastern walls and towers did receive bomb damage, they (unlike the houses in that part of town) remained relatively intact (many even survived completely) due to their sturdy stone construction. In most cases, only the less-stable upper portions and roofs of these eastern towers and walls needed to be rebuilt, while the majority of their stone bases and walls are preserved in their original state to this day.

text: en.wikipedia.org

In Rothenburg ob der Tauber In Rothenburg ob der Tauber
Sights of Rothenburg ob der Tauber

From Rothenburg o.d.T. to Paderborn-Lippstadt

The next morning we were going to fly back to Paderborn-Lippstadt, and return the Cessna to it's base. We first had breakfast in the hotel. A member of the staff handed a spoon and a fork to each of us and instructed that we strictly had to use these at the breakfast buffet. Looking sternly, she said Das ist ein Befehl. From the talks at other tables we noticed that these commands also sounded a little rough to German ears.

After breakfast we checked out from the hotel, and left for the airfield. The taxi did not come, and we then decided to walk to the aerodrome east of the town that was not that far away. It took us about 45 minutes – and we did our daily walk for that day.

We paid the airport fees, and we then took-off from runway 03 to Paderborn-Lippstadt airport. South of Paderborn-Lippstadt we first past the Edersee, and then the Diemelsee. The Edersee dam was bombed by the British in May, 1943.

After 70 minutes we landed on runway 06. We cleaned the plane, finished the paperwork, and put the plane back in the hangar. Then we went home. In the car René talked to one of the club members by phone about the issue with the attitude indicator, and asked him to explain it to the mechanic in German.

It had been a nice trip.

Veleda with the C182 before departure
Veleda with the C182 before departure
Ochsenfurt
Ochsenfurt
Edersee
Edersee
Final runway 06 Paderborn-Lippstadt
Final runway 06 Paderborn-Lippstadt
Veleda cleaning the plane
Veleda cleaning the plane
Rene with the C182
René with the C182

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