Trips / Brielle

trip
Flight over Brielle
2 April 2020
EHHV; Hilversum
Leg, Destination
  1   Hilversum

From Hilversum to Brielle and Hellevoetsluis

After days of intense working from home and avoiding other people due to the coronavirus, it was time again to take a little break. It was April 2; one day after April 1 which normally is a special day in Brielle. Maurits and René made a little trip from Hilversum to Brielle and Hellevoetsluis. On the way up we flew north of Rotterdam airport and south of Delft, and on the return leg we flew south of Rotterdam airport over the city.

EHAA MISCELLANEOUS
A0677/20
From 01 Apr 2020 16:13 until 28 Apr 2020 12:00 EST
COVID-19: FLIGHT RESTRICTIONS.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH PHYSICAL DISTANCING MEASURES COVID-19 BY LOCAL AUTHORITIES BASED ON DIRECTIVES MINISTRIES OF HEALTH AND JUSTICE, GENERAL AVIATION FLIGHTS INCLUDING AERIAL WORK WITH POB, OTHER THAN HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS, DISTANCE LESS THAN 1,5M ARE PROHIBITED.
POLICE, HEMS AND SAR FLIGHTS ARE EXEMPTED.
Coronavirus NOTAM

We passed some places that were already covered in previous trip reports, but there are also new items. For additional details and pictures, select Details at the top of this page, or More at the bottom of this page.

When we arrived at Hilversum airfield and checked checked the plane, the fuel quantity was sufficient for the flight and we did not need to fuel. The runway in use at Hilversum was 25, and after leaving the circuit we set course to Rotterdam.

Maurits checking the fuel quantity
Maurits checking the fuel quantity
Departure from Hilversum airfield
Departure from Hilversum airfield

The Port of Rotterdam is the largest seaport in Europe. It stretches over a distance of 40 kilometres from Rotterdam center to the reclaimed Maasvlakte area, which projects into the North Sea. Europoort is an area of the Port of Rotterdam. The Europoort area is heavily industrialised with petrochemical refineries and storage tanks, bulk iron ore and coal handling as well as container and new motor vehicle terminals.

Brielle is a historic and fortified sea side town west of Rotterdam and south of Europoort. It's a historic place, best known for the Capture of Brielle by the Watergeuzen (Dutch rebels) from the Spaniards on April 1, 1572 during the Eighty Years War. Much of the towns fortifications have survived the test of time, and seen from the air, the typical shape of the traditional Old-Dutch fortification structure is still clearly visible.

Tank storage 7e Petroleumhaven, Rotterdam
Tank storage 7e Petroleumhaven, Rotterdam
Brielle
Brielle

During the Eighty Years' War between the Netherlands and Spain, the Capture of Brielle on April 1, 1572, by the Watergeuzen, marked a turning point in the conflict, as many towns in Holland then began to support William of Orange against the Spanish Duke of Alba who was sent to pacify The Netherlands. This event is still celebrated each year on April 1 in Brielle. A short rhyme remembers this fact, which rhyme refers to April Fools' Day:

Op 1 april verloor Alva zijn bril
Op April zes verloor Alva zijn fles

On April 1st, Alva lost his glasses
On April 6th Alva lost his bottle

In Dutch, bril is the word for "glasses", and it closely rhymes with Briel; as does Fles which stands for the town of Vlissingen, and was the next town to be captured by the Dutch rebels.

Hellevoetsluis is located on the Haringvliet, close to the broad Zeeland landscape. During the 17th and 18th century Hellevoetsluis was the naval port of the Admiralty of Rotterdam and could accommodate an entire fleet within a special land-enclosed fortress with harbour and dockyard facilities, accessible through a canal. Thanks to its strategic situation the town grew from the beginning of the 17th century to be the homeport for the Dutch war fleet.

The Hartelkering (Hartel barrier) is a storm surge barrier near Spijkenisse. It is part of the Delta Works project and is designed to close the Hartel Canal in case of a storm surge. On Wednesday 3 January 2018, a severe storm caused water levels to rise all along the coast. For the first time ever, all 5 of the country's storm surge barriers on the same day.

Hellevoetsluis
Hellevoetsluis
Hartelkering
Hartelkering
Because the mouth of the Meuse from Rotterdam to the North Sea had been silted up considerably in the early 19th century, a Canal through Voorne was dug between Hellevoetsluis and the New Meuse, shortening the connection between Rotterdam and the sea. However, soon Ocean-going ships became too large to use the canal and the New Waterway was dug, making the Canal through Voorne redundant.

Kanaal door Voorne
Kanaal door Voorne

Delfshaven is a historic harbour and one of the oldest places in Rotterdam. Delfshaven locals once earned their living by fishing for herring and distilling gin. The reconstructed 18th-century windmill overlooks the water at Delfshaven. It still mills grain, but the interior is closed to the public.

Rotterdam is the second largest city in the Netherlands. The city lies on both banks of the Nieuwe Maas, the tidal southern arm of the Rhine, where it's joined by the little River Rotte. Its history goes back to 1270 when a dam was constructed in the Rotte river. The heart of Rotterdam was almost completely destroyed by the Luftwaffe on 14 May 1940. Central Rotterdam was energetically rebuilt after the war and re-planned with modern shopping streets, residential districts, and high-rises, making it one of the most modern and architecturally interesting cities in Europe.

Delfshaven, Rotterdam
Delfshaven, Rotterdam
Rotterdam center
Rotterdam center

Delfshaven is a small inner-city harbor with historical buildings. The town of Delfshaven grew around the port of the city of Delft. Delft itself was not located on a major river, so in 1389 the Delfshavensche Schie was dug and a harbour was created about 10km south of the city, to be able to receive seafaring vessels and avoid tolls being levied by the neighbouring and competing city of Rotterdam.

In 1620, the pilgrims gathered in the Pilgrim Fathers' Church before crossing the ocean, heading for America. Delfhaven is the birthplace of Piet Hein, who during the Eighty Years' War captured a large part of a Spanish treasure fleet ("silver fleet") in the Caribbean. In 1886 Delfshaven became part of Rotterdam.

Delfhavensche Schie to Delfshaven
Delfhavensche Schie to Delfshaven (right)
Rene in Delfshaven
René in Delfshaven

After overflying the city of Rotterdam, we left the CTR near Gouda. We crossed the river Oude Rijn (Old Rhine) at Woerden.

The Oude Rijn flows from Utrecht to the North Sea at Katwijk. In Roman times, the Oude Rijn was the main Rhine branch, forming the northern border of the Roman Empire. The river silted up in the course of the Middle Ages and the river Lek became the primary Rhine branch. The Oude Rijn had lost all of its importance by the 17th century.

When we arrived at Hilversum airfield, we first made two touch-and-go's before the full stop landing.

Old Rhine, Woerden
Old Rhine, Woerden
Rene at Hilversum airfield
Rene at Hilversum airfield

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