Trips / Borken-Hoxfeld

trip
Borken-Hoxfeld
11 August 2019
EHHV; Hilversum EDLY; Borken-Hoxfeld
Leg, Destination
  1   Borken
  2   Hilversum



From Hilversum to Borken-Hoxfeld

On Sunday, August 11, 2019, Marco, Sacha and Nina joined René for a little Sunday afternoon flight from Hilversum airfield. The initial plan was to visit the island of Texel, but because of the strong winds along the coast provinces we made a trip to Boxten-Hoxfeld instead.

After take-off from runway 25, we soon headed into the direction of Amersfoort. We did an orbit over Amersfoort, and we saw the Belgian Monument in the south of Amersfoort.

Sacha, Nina and Marco before departure at Hilversum airfield
Sacha, Nina and Marco at Hilversum airfield
Amersfoort
Amersfoort

We continued to the south-east, passing Leusden, Woudenberg, Veenendaal and Amerongen. Then we flew along the River Lek further to the east, over the Betuwe region.

In the east of the Betuwe, along the small river Linge, we past Castle Doornenburg, and then Fort Pannerden. Fort Pannerden was constructed between 1869 and 1871 to serve as part of the New Dutch Waterline.

Belgian Monument in Amersfoort
Belgian Monument in Amersfoort
Castle Doornenburg
Castle Doornenburg
Belgian Monument

The Belgian Monument is by far the largest war monument in the Netherlands and stands on top of the 43 meter high Amersfoortse Berg. In the middle tower there is a carillon, which is regularly played by students of the Amersfoorts Carillonneur School. The construction of the Belgian monument was due to the outbreak of the First World War in 1914.

Offensive against Antwerp
Offensive against Antwerp
Belgian refugees
Belgian refugees arriving in the Netherlands
Germany invaded Belgium on August 4, 1914. From Belgium, many soldiers (Belgians, but also some Germans) and a large part of the civilian population fled to the neutral Netherlands. According to international treaties, the Netherlands as a neutral country had to disarm and intern all soldiers who fled to the country in a time of war. Near Amersfoort the Camp Zeist was built, consisting of wooden barracks.

The camps were heavily guarded and a barbed wire barrier was installed around it. The living conditions were poor, the barracks were not heated. To combat the rats, the camp leaders promised a reward of two and a half cents for each dead rat.

Belgian military
Belgian military
Internment camp
Internment camp
On December 2, 1914, an uprising broke out among the internees in Camp Zeist. Eight people were killed and eighteen were injured. The responsible Minister of War was forced to reorganize the camps and humanize the regime.

From April 1915, more and more Belgian soldiers were allowed to work outside their camp. In 1916 and 1917 camps were built in the area to house wifes of interned soldiers.

Internment camp
Internment camp
Women's camp
Women's camp
In October 1916 a Belgian Commission proposed to build a memorial on as a token of appreciation for the hospitality enjoyed. It would be handed over to the municipality of Amersfoort after completion. The Belgian architect Huib Hoste made a design for the intended location on the Amersfoortse Berg, with more than forty-three meters one of the highest peaks of the Utrechtse Heuvelrug (Utrecht Hill ridge). The landscape integration was the work of the Belgian garden architect Louis van der Swaelmen.

Work started in May 1917. It would take until the spring of 1919 before the monument was completely finished. Work on the monument was carried out by interned Belgian soldiers, students from the work schools in the camps.

Belgian monument
Belgian monument
Wilhelmina and Leopold in 1938
1938; Wilhelmina and Leopold
Due to the tense relations between the Netherlands and Belgium after the end of the First World War, the official transfer to the municipality of Amersfoort took until November 22, 1938. Queen Wilhelmina and King Leopold III then jointly unveiled a memorial plaque.

Sights of Belgian monument
Veleda and René at the Belgian monument
Doornenburg Castle
Doornenburg Castle
Doornenburg Castle is located in the eastern part of the province of Gelderland, near the village of Doornenburg. The castle is first mentioned in 1295. It isn't known how the castle looked back then. The oldest parts of the present structure date back to the 14th century. The castle then consisted of a large hall with cellars and a walled rectangular courtyard on a moated island.

Doornenburg Castle sights

(More about Castle Doornenburg in this trip report)

We continued along the Rhine to Emmerich am Rhein, and then we flew to 's-Heerenberg to look at the castle Huis Bergh. A few kilometers further to the east we also passed castle Anholt, one of North-Rhine Westphalia's few privately owned castles, and now used as a museum.

At Borken-Hoxfeld we joined the left-hand downwind to land on runway 30. After landing we enjoyed a drink at the quiet airfield.

Huis Bergh Castle, s-Heerenberg
Huis Bergh Castle, 's-Heerenberg
At Borken-Hoxfeld airfield
At Borken-Hoxfeld airfield
Castle Huis Bergh

Castle Huis Bergh
Castle Huis Bergh
Castle "Huis Bergh" (House Bergh) is a castle in 's-Heerenberg. Little is known about the earliest history of Huis Bergh Castle. It is believed that around 1100 AD a wooden tower was raised on a little island in a swamp. Around 1200 AD this wooden tower, or donjon, came to be replaced by a round tower. The remains of this tuff tower can still be seen in the wall left to the present main entrance door to the great hall.
In subsequent years the main castle building was enlarged upon. At the onset of the Eighty Years’ War Huis Bergh Castle was seriously damaged. In 1735 the main castle building was completely destroyed by fire. In 1939 the castle was once again struck by fire. Van Heek, who had acquired the castle in 1912, immediately took on restoring the castle.

Hendrik van den Bergh
Hendrik van den Bergh
Count Hendrik van den Bergh (1573-1638) played a controversial role in the Eighty Years' War. Hendrik van den Bergh was the commander-in-chief of the Spanish army in the Netherlands, and he was cousin of Frederick Hendrik, Prince of Orange. After Hendrik van den Bergh's defeat at the siege of Den Bosch in 1629, he later led a noble party dissatisfied with Spanish involvement in the Southern Netherlands It culminated in the Conspiracy of Nobles, a plot in 1632 to divide the Spanish Netherlands between the Dutch Republic and the Kingdom of France. Hendrik van den Bergh negotiated with René de Renesse, 1st Count of Warfusée and Frederick Hendrik and defected to his cousin's forces. Hendrik van den Bergh died on 12th May 1638 in Zutphen.

Sights of Huis Bergh
Sights of Huis Bergh



From Borken-Hoxfeld to Hilversum

At Borken-Hoxfeld we filed the flightplan, which is still mandatory for cross-border flights to and from the Netherlands. René sent an ETA message to the person who was going to take the plane next for a two day trip to the UK.

We departed Boxten-Hoxfeld, and then we set course back to Hilversum.

View of Borken-Hoxfeld airfield after take-off runway 30
View of Borken-Hoxfeld airfield
Marco at the controls
Marco at the controls

On the way we passed Arnhem, Ede, Renswoude and Scherpenzeel. Sacha and Nina were enjoying themselves a lot in the rear of the plane.

River IJssel near Velp
River IJssel near Velp
Castle Renswoude
Castle Renswoude
Continuing to the north-west along the Utrechtse Heuvelrug we passed the Pyramid of Austerlitz, the 36-metre-high pyramid of earth, built in 1804 by Napoleon's soldiers on one of the highest points of the Utrecht hill ridge.

We approached Hilversum from the south-east, and joined the left-hand circuit of runway 25 for landing. It had been a nice Sunday afternoon trip.

Pyramid of Austerlitz
Pyramid of Austerlitz
Marco cleaning the plane after arrival
Marco cleaning the plane


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