Trips / Hilversum

trip
With Boris and Maksim to Hilversum
19 April 2019
EDLP; Paderborn-Lippstadt EDLS; Stadtlohn EHHV; Hilversum
Paderborn
Stadtlohn
Hilversum



From Paderborn-Lippstadt to Stadtlohn

Veleda and Maurits were going to La Motte-du-Caire in the French Alps for two weeks for a gliding (sailplane) holiday of Maurits. Weather permitting, René would fly to nearby Sisteron to join them during the first week. On Friday, René first flew a Piper Archer from Paderborn-Lippstadt to Hilversum, albeit the weather outlook for the Alps was not good for the coming days. As we had booked the plane, and had taken the week off from work, we would see how it would work out.

Boris and Maksim joined René to fly the plane from Paderborn-Lippstadt to Hilversum on Friday. We made a stop about half-way, so both Boris and Maksim could have their turn steering the plane. First Boris took the controls en-route.

Maksim and Boris at Paderborn-Lippstadt
Maksim and Boris at Paderborn-Lippstadt
Boris at the controls
Boris at the controls
Mohne dam
Möhne dam
Haltern reservoir
Haltern reservoir

Haltern Waterworks

The Haltern Waterworks were built in 1908. Today, they are among the largest of their kind in Europe, supplying drinking water to over one million residents in more than 20 communities and to the business and industry in the Ruhr and Münsterland regions of Germany. The two water dams in Haltern and Hullern and the Haltener sand deposits with a thickness of up to 300 meters provide ideal conditions for water collection. Haltern Waterworks have an annual capacity of 129 million cubic meters.

(See also The Dambusters page about the Möhne dam and the Haltern Waterworks)

Maksim enjoying the flight
Maksim enjoying the flight
Boris and Maksim at Stadtlohn
Boris and Maksim at Stadtlohn



From Stadtlohn to Hilversum

After our stop at Stadtlohn, Boris took the right front seat to steer the plane to Hilversum. On the way we took the opportunity for some sightseeing (for the pictures, click 'More' below).

Boris the passenger
Boris the passenger
Maksim at the controls
Maksim at the controls
Castle Anholt
Castle Anholt
Grebbeberg
Grebbeberg

Castle Anholt

The origins of Castle Anholt lie in a fortress from the 12th century to secure the possession of the diocese of Utrecht. It is one of North-Rhine Westphalia's few privately owned castles. Further extensions in around 1700 created a grand baroque residence. Today, the moated castle is used as a museum founded by Prince Nikolaus of Salm-Salm, which features a private collection documenting his family's history.

Castle Amerongen
Castle Amerongen
Maksim and Boris at Hilversum airfield
Maksim and Boris at Hilversum airfield

Amerongen Castle

Amerongen Castle
Amerongen Castle
The history of Amerongen Castle dates back to 1286, though in the centuries that followed, the castle was destroyed and rebuilt several times. The current castle dates from 1680, after its precursor was burned down by French troops in 1673. The castle, surrouned by historical gardens, is situated in the picturesque village of Amerongen at the foot of the Utrecht Hills.

Desk where Wilhelm II signed his abdication
Desk where the abdication was signed
In November 1918, the German Kaiser Wilhelm II (1859-1941) was in Spa, Belgium. He fled to The Netherlands, where he was granted political asylum and was temporarily housed in Amerongen Castle. Wilhelm II stayed here for nearly two years, and signed his abdication here in 1918. The desk at which this happened is still part of the Amerongen collection.


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