Trips / Croatia

trip
Holiday to Vrsar, Croatia
8/22 July 2011
From Paderborn to Bad Endorf From Bad Endorf to Vrsar Trip to Zagreb Trip to Zadar Trip to Trogir Trip to Mostar Trip to Dubrovnik From Vrsar to Paderborn EHLP; Paderborn EDQC; Coburg EDQD; Bayreuth EDPC; Bad Endorf LOIJ; St.Johann in Tirol LOKL; Lienz LIPQ; Trieste LDPV; Vrsar LDPN; Unije LDLO; Losinj LDPL; Pula LDPM; Medulin LDRG; Grobnick LDRO; Otocac LDZA; Zagreb LDZD; Zadar LDSP; Split LQMO; Mostar LDDU; Dubrovnik LDSB; Brac LJPZ; Portoroz EDMY; Muhldorf



From Paderborn to Bad Endorf

On Friday, 8 July 2011, Maurits and René flew from Paderborn-Lippstadt to Bad Endorf, where we would meet again with Veleda and Charlotte who were in the mean time driving there. We aimed to catch-up at the end of the afternoon, and Maurits and René inserted two fun stops on the way to Bad Endorf; one at Coburg, and the other one at Bayreuth. At Bad Endorf we first fueled, and then waited for Veleda and Charlotte to arrive by car. We stayed the night at Hotel Kern in nearby Halfing.

Rene at Paderborn-Lippstadt airport
René at Paderborn-Lippstadt airport
Maurits at Coburg, Brandensteinsebene airport
Maurits at Coburg, Brandensteinsebene airport
At Bayreuth airport
At Bayreuth airport
Arrived at Bad Endorf
Arrived at Bad Endorf



From Bad Endorf to Vrsar

The next morning we travelled from Bad Endorf to Vrsar, our holiday destination in Croatia. This time Charlotte joined René by plane, and Maurits with Veleda by car. On the way to Vrsar, Charlotte and René made stops at St.Johann in Tirol, Lienz and Trieste. On the leg from St.Johann in Tirol to Lienz we crossed the Felber Tauern pass west of the Grossglockner, the highest mountain of Austria and the highest mountain in the Alps east of the Brenner Pass. At Trieste airport we passed the border control to exit the Schengen area, and then we flew to Vrsar. Upon arriving at vrsar airfield we walked passed the border control that was available on the airfield during the summer months.

Rene at St.Johann in Tirol airport
René at St.Johann in Tirol airport
At Lienz, Nikolsdorf Airport
At Lienz, Nikolsdorf Airport
At Trieste, Ronchi dei Legionari Airport
At Trieste, Ronchi dei Legionari Airport
Passing Porec near Vrsar airport
Passing Porec near Vrsar airport



Trip to Lošinj Island via Unije

On Monday, 11 July, Veleda, Maurits and René made a trip to Lošinj Island. Charlotte stayed at Vrsar to do some studying. We first made a short stop at the desolated Unije airfield. Upon arriving at Lošinj Island airport we took a taxi to Mali Lošinj. Mali Lošinj is a natural harbour ringed by Mediterranean town houses and green surrounding hills. The town straddles both coasts on the narrowest section of the island, at the apex of a long protected harbour. After visiting Mali Lošinj we went back to the airport, and then we flew back to Vrsar.

Approaching Unije airfield
Approaching Unije airfield
Rene and Maurits at Unije airfield
René and Maurits at Unije airfield
Rene and Veleda in Mali Losinj
René and Veleda in Mali Lošinj
Leaving Losinj Island
Leaving Lošinj Island



Trip to Pula and Medulin

On Tuesday, July 12, René and Veleda flew to nearby Pula for fueling. We flew along the coast from Vrsar, passing Rovinj and the Brijuni Islands on the way to Pula. The Brijuni Islands owe their fame to Tito, the extravagant Yugoslav leader who turned them into his private retreat. Each year from 1947 until just before his death in 1980, Tito spent six months in Brijuni at his hideaway. To create a lush comfort zone, he introduced subtropical plant species and created a safari park to house the exotic animals gifted to him by world leaders. We landed on Pula runway 09, and then we waited for the fuel truck to arrive. After fueling we took off for a short hop to Medulin airfield, where we landed on runway 12. We had a drink at the airfield and talked somewhat to the people there before returning to Vrsar. In the afternoon we all went to a beach at Vrsar.

Rovinj
Rovinj
Rene and Veleda at Pula airport
René and Veleda at Pula airport
Rene at Medulin airfield
René at Medulin airfield
Pula
Pula

Charlotte and Rene near the amphitheatre in Pula
Near the amphitheatre in Pula
Pula and Rovinj

On Wednesday, July 13, we visited Pula and Rovinj by car. Pula is the largest city in Istria County, situated at the southern tip of the Istria peninsula. The most remarkable landmark is the well-preserved Roman amphitheatre in the heart of the city, which dominates the streetscape and doubles as a venue for summer concerts and festivals.

Temple of Augustus in Pula
Temple of Augustus
The Temple of Augustus is a well-preserved Roman temple. The temple is the only visible remnant from the Roman era on the Forum, Pula’s central meeting place from antiquity through the Middle Ages. Dedicated to the first Roman emperor, Augustus, it was probably built during the emperor's lifetime at some point between 2 BC and his death in AD 14. When the Romans left, it became a church and then a grain warehouse. It was struck by a bomb during an Allied air raid in 1944, almost totally destroying it, but was reconstructed in 1947. It now houses a small historical museum to display items of Roman sculpture.
Zerostrasse at Pula
Zerostrasse at Pula
The Austro-Hungarian underground tunnels in the center of Pula were built before and during World War I to shelter the city's population and serve as storage for ammunition. Today one can walk through several of its sections, which all lead to the middle, where a photo exhibit shows early aviation in Pula.
Carrera Street in Rovinj
Carrera Street in Rovinj
Rovinj is coastal Istria’s star attraction. It is a popular tourist resort and an active fishing port. The old town is contained within an egg-shaped peninsula. The town's main central thoroughfare is the fully pedestrian Carrera Street, with many independent shops and art galleries.
St. Euphemia's Basilica
St. Euphemia's Basilica
The Church of St Euphemia is the town’s showcase. Saint Euphemia's basilica is a Baroque church located in the heart of the historic part of Rovinj, Croatia, dominating the town from its hilltop location in the middle of the peninsula. Built in 1736, it’s the largest baroque building in Istria, reflecting the period during the 18th century when Rovinj was its most populous town. Inside is the marble tomb of St Euphemia behind the right-hand altar.


Trip to Grobnik and Otočac

On Thursday, 14 July, Maurits and René made a flying trip to Grobnik and Otočac. The Grobnik aerodrome is north of Rijeka, next to the Automotodron race-track. It was the former Rijeka airport before the Rijeka airport on the island Krk was opened in 1970. We had a drink at the restaurant on the further quiet aerodrome before we continued to Otočac. At the quiet Otočac airfield we landed on runway 33. Maurits and René had a drink, and then we took-off from runway 15 to return to Vrsar.

Approaching Grobnik airport
Approaching Grobnik airport
Rene at Grobnicko Polje airport
René at Grobnicko Polje airport
Final runway 33 Otocac airfield
Final runway 33 Otočac airfield
Maurits at Otocac airfield
Maurits at Otočac airfield

Euphrasian Basilica
Euphrasian Basilica
Poreč

On Friday, July 15, Veleda, Maurits and René visited the ancient Roman town of Poreč. Charlotte stayed in Vrsar to study. The major landmark of Poreč is the 6th century Euphrasian Basilica. Built on the site of a 4th-century oratory, the sacral complex includes a church, an atrium and a baptistery.

Christ and the twelve Apostles mosaic
Christ and the twelve Apostles mosaic
The present basilica, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, was built during the period of Bishop Euphrasius. Following the earthquake of 1440 the southern wall of the central nave of the basilica was restored. The most striking feature of the basilica are its mosaics, dating from the 6th century, and which are considered amongst the finest examples of Byzantine art in the world.
Veleda and Maurits in Porec
Veleda and Maurits in Poreč
Poreč has three 15th-century towers that date from the Venetian rule and once formed the city walls, as the better-known Dubrovnik still does today. Ever since the 1970s, the coast of Poreč has been the most visited tourist destination in Croatia. It is the centrepiece of a vast system of tourist resorts that stretches along the west coast of Istria. Poreč is not the place for a quiet getaway.


Trip to Zagreb

On Saturday, 16 July, we visited Zagreb. We flew to Zagreb International Airport, also known as Pleso Airport. Upon arrival we first fueled the plane before we went to the city. Zagreb's main orientation point and its geographic heart is Trg Bana Jelačića. The statue of Jelačić stood in the square from 1866 until 1947, when Tito ordered its removal because it was too closely linked with Croatian nationalism. It was returned to the square in 1990. We made a long walk in the city. Gornji Grad, or upper city, is the medieval part of the centre of Zagreb. We passed the Zagreb Cathedral and the famous central market Dolac. At the end of the afternoon we went back to the airport, to fly back to Vrsar.

At Zagreb, Pleso airport
At Zagreb, Pleso airport
At the Trq Bana Jelacica, Zagreb
At the Trq Bana Jelačića, Zagreb
In front of the Zagreb Cathedral
In front of the Zagreb Cathedral
Charlotte with the guards at Trg A Stepinca
Charlotte with the guards at Trg A Stepinca



Trip to Zadar and Trogir

Sunday 17 July was the first day of a three day trip along to the coast of Croatia. We first flew to Zadar, where we also visited the city. Then we continued to Split airport, from where we took a taxi to Trogir.

Plomin
Plomin
Rene at Zadar airport
René at Zadar airport
Trogir seen on approach to Split airport
Trogir seen on approach to Split airport
Final runway 05 Split airport
Final runway 05 Split airport

Kopnena vrata in Zadar
Kopnena vrata in Zadar
Zadar and Trogir

Zadar is a historical center of Dalmatia. The district of present day Zadar has been populated since prehistoric times. One of the most intriguing things about Zadar is the way Roman ruins seem to sprout randomly from the city's streets. The 16th and 17th centuries were noted in Zadar for Ottoman attacks. Due to that threat, the construction of a new system of castles and walls began.

St Donatus' Church
St Donatus' Church
Saint Donatus was an Irishman who became a Dalmatian bishop and a diplomat for the city of Zadar. Donatus began construction of a cathedral at Zadar to be called The Church of the Holy Trinity. The cathedral was finished in the beginning of the 9th century and in the 15th century. Its name was changed to the Church of St. Donatus. The church is the largest Pre-Romanesque building in Croatia.
Trogir Cathedral
Trogir Cathedral
Trogir is a historic town and harbour on the Adriatic coast north-west of Split. The historic city of Trogir is situated on a small island between the Croatian mainland and the island of Čiovo. Trogir is unique among Dalmatian towns for its profuse collection of Romanesque and Renaissance architecture. The showcase of Trogir is the three-naved Venetian cathedral, one of the finest architectural works in Croatia, built from the 13th to 15th centuries. On top of the bell tower there are four statues, the work of Venetian sculptor Alessandro Vittoria.
Kamerlengo Fortress
Kamerlengo Fortress
The Kamerlengo Fortress was built around the 15th century by Marin Radoj as part of an expansion of the Veriga Tower, built on the site in the late 14th century. The fortress hosts concerts during the Trogir Summer festival. Trogir is an easy day trip from Split and a relaxing place to spend a few days.


Trip to Mostar

The next morning, on Monday 18 July, we took a taxi back to Split airport. From there we flew to Mostar in southern Bosnia and Herzegovina. We followed the coast to Netko, a reporting point on the border of Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina at the Neretva river. From there we flew to the north-east to Mostar. We requested Mostar Tower to orbit the city, which was granted, before we landed on runway 16. From the quiet Mostar airport we took a taxi to Mostar.

Exclusive bus to the plane at Split airport
Exclusive bus to the plane at Split airport
Over Split
Over Split
Over Mostar old town
Over Mostar old town
Final runway 16 Mostar airport
Final runway 16 Mostar airport

With the Stari Most
With the Stari Most
Mostar

Mostar was named after the bridge keepers who in the medieval times guarded the Stari Most (Old Bridge) over the Neretva river. The Old Bridge, built by the Ottomans in the 16th century, is one of Bosnia and Herzegovina's most recognizable landmarks, and is considered one of the most exemplary pieces of Islamic architecture in the Balkans.

with the Karadjoz-bey Mosque
with the Karadjoz-bey Mosque
Mostar has architecturally noteworthy buildings in a wide range of styles. The Ottomans used monumental architecture to affirm, extend and consolidate their colonial holdings. Out of the thirteen original mosques dating from the 16th and 17th centuries, seven have been lost during the 20th century for ideological reasons or by bombardment. Karagöz Mosque was built in the mid-16th century. The mosque was severely damaged during World War II, and faced near destruction during the Bosnian War in the early 1990s. However, Karagözbey Mosque, like the rest of Mostar, underwent extensive repairs between 2002 and 2004.
Vivid scars of the 1990s war
Vivid scars of the 1990s war
There are still vivid scars of the 1990s war that remain visible beyond the cobbled lanes of the attractively restored Ottoman quarter. During the Balkans conflict, some of the most vicious fighting took place in the town of Mostar. The predominantly Croat west river bank was "clensed" of Bosniaks, who were forced to flee to the predomianantly Bosniak east river bank (see also this BBC documentary on YouTube).


Trip to Dubrovnik and Brač

The next morning, Tuesday 19 July, we had breakfast early, and then we left for the airport to fly to Dubrovnik. We first flew south-west to Netko, the same point where we crossed the border of Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina on the way up to Mostar. Then we followed the coast to Dubrovnik. On the approach to Dubrovnik airport we passed the old town. We landed on runway 12. Outside the airport terminal we took a taxi to Dubrovnik, and we visited the old town. In the afternoon we returned to the airport to fly back to Vrsar with a stop at Brač island.

At Mostar airport before departure
At Mostar airport before departure
Dubrovnik old town
Dubrovnik old town
Approaching Brac Island
Approaching Brač Island
Veleda at Brac Island airport
Veleda at Brač Island airport

Pile gates
At the Pile gates
Dubrovnik and Brač Island

Dubrovnik is one of the most prominent tourist destinations in the Mediterranean. The Walls of Dubrovnik, constructed mainly during the 12th–17th centuries, are a series of defensive stone walls that have surrounded and protected the citizens of Dubrovnik.

St Donatus' Church
St Donatus' Church
Stradun is the main street of Dubrovnik. The limestone-paved pedestrian street runs some 300 metres through the Old Town. Both ends are also marked with 15th-century fountains and bell towers. Many of the historic buildings and monuments in Dubrovnik are situated along the Stradun.
Town of Bol and Zlatni Rat
Town of Bol and Zlatni Rat
Brač is famous for its radiant white stone, from which Diocletian’s Palace in Split, the Canadian National Vimy Memorial and the White House in Washington, DC are made. It’s the largest island in central Dalmatia, with two towns, several sleepy villages and a landscape of steep cliffs, inky waters and pine forests.
Brac island airport
Brač island airport
Brač is also famous for Zlatni Rat, the long pebbly beach at Bol that sticks out into the Adriatic. Bol Airport on Brač is the largest airport of all islands surrounding Split. The airport is 1776 ft above the sea level, and is 14 km far from Zlatni rat. We past the town and the beach after take-off from runway 22 of Brač airport.


Two days relaxing around Vrsar

Wednesday 20 July and Thursday 21 July were relaxing days. We made some walks, and we went to the beach. René kept an eye on weather developments for the trip back home that weekend. On Thursday evenening we decided to fly on Friday, as for Saturday and Sunday the weather outlook was worse.

Maurits and Charlotte on a lookout at the Limski canal
On a lookout at the Limski canal
Towed by a motorboat
Towed by a motorboat

Weather analysis 22 July 2011
Weather analysis 22 July 2011
From Vrsar to Paderborn-Lippstadt

On Friday morning, July 22, Maurits and René first flew to Portoroz to enter the Schengen area. At Portoroz we checked the latest weather. We decided to fly the Brenner route to Mühldorf. North of the Alps there were rain showers, but we were able to avoid them. We fueled at Mühldorf and we had lunch there. Then continued to Paderborn-Lippstadt, where we arrived at the end of the afternoon.

Rene at Portoroz airport
René at Portoroz airport
Between Trento and Bolzano
Between Trento and Bolzano
Maurits at Muhldorf airport
Maurits at Mühldorf airport
Lunch at Muhldorf airport
Lunch at Mühldorf airport
Satellite 22 July 2011
Satellite 22 July 2011
Radar 22 July 2011
Radar 22 July 2011


 Statistics July 8/July 22 2011
 --------------------------------
 Number of Flights: 27
 Distance flown   : 2,100 NM
 Airports visited : 22
 Block time       : 27:00
 Flight time      : 22:30
 

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